1801-1803. מרר relates to her mournful lot. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/ruth-1.html. Moreover, this thought would not be in harmony with the following clause: "for the hand of the Lord has gone out against me," i.e., the Lord has sorely smitten me, namely by taking away not only my husband, but also my two sons. When Carpzov therefore defines the meaning of her words in this manner, "I have indeed no more children to hope for, to whom I could marry you in time, and I have no command over others," the first thought does not exhaust the meaning of the words, and the last is altogether foreign to the text.). And a certain man of Bethlehem-Judah went to sojourn in the country of Moab, he, and his wife, and his two sons. BibliographyGill, John. ‘And Naomi said, “Turn again, my daughters. have I yet sons … that they may be your husbands. Ruth is also one of the few places in the male-dominated world of Scripture where women play … "People are often surprised to find that the words from Ruth 1:16b-17, often heard at weddings, are not about the joys of beginning a new life together." can it be thought that at my age, supposing I had an husband, or an husband's brother to marry me, that there is in me a natural power of conceiving and bearing children? An author is not mentioned in Ruth. Have I yet sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands?”. Clarke's Commentary on the Bible. (Ruth 1:11,12,13). "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". Ruth 1:11-13. Naomi returns home. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers, Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament. 1832. But Naomi recognised that she now had nothing to offer them. "The Adam Clarke Commentary". (2-3) Ruth happens upon Boaz’s field. BibliographyPoole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". BibliographyTorrey, R. A. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/ruth-1.html. 10 And they said vnto her, Surely wee will returne with thee, vnto thy people. Commentary on Ruth 1:8-18 By L.G. Copyright StatementThese files are public domain. Ruth 1 Commentary; MATTHEW HENRY. “Boaz Is Our Near Kinsman” Ruth 2:10-23; The Midnight Meeting Ruth 3:1-11; When You Are In Love Ruth 3:11-18; Redeemed Ruth 4:1-22; KEIL AND DELITZSCH Commentary on Ruth. What object of self-interest can ye have? ; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. The book of Ruth also teaches us about the providence of God in the lives of those who determine to follow Him. His name was Elimelech. 1999. are there yet any more sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands? (1-8) Boaz marries Ruth. Are there yet any more sons - This was spoken in allusion to the custom, that when a married brother died without leaving posterity, his brother should take his widow; and the children of such a marriage were accounted the children of the deceased brother. Ruth 1:11 Parallel. And Naomi said, Turn again, my daughters: why will ye go with me? "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". this she said in order to get out of them if there was any real inclination in them to the true worship and service of God; though she keeps out that from her own questions put to them as follows, that it might come purely from themselves: are there yet any more sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands? Why would you come with me? They were Ephrathites from Bethlehem, Judah. Orpah stays behind, but Ruth goes with Naomi. what reason can you give? (Verse 15-18.) To what purpose should you go with me? Ruth overview - Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament; James Rosscup writes "Keil, C. F. and Franz Delitzsch. 1874-1909. 9 The LORD grant you that ye may find rest, each of you in the house of her husband. And they said to her, “Surely we … Your husbands — According to the ancient custom, Genesis 38:8, and the express law of God, Deuteronomy 25:5, which doubtless she had acquainted them with before, among other branches of the Jewish religion. She, old, childless, and solitary, must wend her weary way back to live unaided as best she may. BibliographyJamieson, Robert, D.D. 1:22 "Ruth the Moabitess" Throughout the book, Ruth's national origin is stated repeatedly (cf. BibliographyClarke, Adam. The first verse of the book points to the time of the Judges and the very last verse points to King David. Ruth 1:1 "Now it came to pass in the days when the judges ruled, that there was a famine in the … Parkhurst, Jr. Ruth 1:11 And Naomi said, Turn again, my daughters: why will ye go with me? 8 And Naomi said unto her two daughters in law, Go, return each to her mother's house: the LORD deal kindly with you, as ye have dealt with the dead, and with me. Ruth 1:11 Keil and Delitzsch Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament Naomi endeavoured to dissuade them from this resolution, by setting before them the fact, that if they went with her, there would be no hope of their being married again, and enjoying the pleasures of life once more. In primitive cultures, famines occur naturally due to … This alludes to the ancient custom (Genesis 38:26), afterward expressly sanctioned by the law of Moses (Deuteronomy 25:5), which required a younger son to marry the widow of his deceased brother. "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". Ruth 1 Commentary; WILLIAM HESLOP. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". The Book of Ruth, verse by verse commentary, Robert Nguyen Cramer, BibleTexts.com. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ruth-1.html. (Ruth 1:8) But Naomi said to her two daughters-in-law, “Go back each See Luke 9:57. There Is A Redeemer - YouTube Video; DAVID GUZIK. "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". As the genealogy in chapter 4:17.22 goes down to King David this short book of Ruth was written at the time of David (around 1000 BC). Commentary on Ruth 1:19-22 (Read Ruth 1:19-22) Naomi and Ruth came to Bethlehem. 11 But Naomi said, “Return home, my daughters. The first verse of the book points to the time of the Judges and the very last verse points to King David. מכּם is comparative, "before you;" not "it grieveth me much on your account," for which עליכם would be used, as in 2 Samuel 1:26. 1765. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/ruth-1.html. Why would you come with me? Articles and Background: Hebrew Has a Word for It (1) , Hebrew Has a Word for It (2) , Ruth is from Moab but Boaz is from Bethlehem , Chance or Providence? https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/ruth-1.html. Ruth 1 Commentary; L M GRANT. Naomi Loses Her Husband and Sons. Notice these instances where God made provision: w Ruth came to know Him (1:1-4) w Ruth supported herself and Naomi and came into contact with Boaz (1:22 Œ 2:3) w Boaz redeeming Ruth … BibliographyPett, Peter. 3. Am I going to have any more sons, who could become your husbands? Those that intend for heaven must not dream of a delicacy: but, being to build the tower of godliness, let them consider first, and cast up what it will cost them, lest they with shame give over in the midst, and "lose the things that they have wrought": but that they may "receive a full reward." Have I yet sons in my womb, that might be husbands to you? She was now a woman of a sorrowful spirit. They come to Bethlehem. Then she kissed them, and they lift vp their voyce and wept. 1871-8. And Naomi said, Turn again, my daughters: why will ye go with me? BibliographyWhedon, Daniel. Ruth's Faithfulness. is there any likelihood that I should ever have any sons to be instead of husbands, or really husbands to you? Naomi here reminds Ruth and Orpah, in the spirit of her age and country, that she has no more sons for them. Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible, George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary, Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged, Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers, Commentary Critical and Explanatory - Unabridged, Kretzmann's Popular Commentary of the Bible, Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scriptures. That she was not with child; so there could be no expectation. Commentary Read Ruth 1:1-5 The International Bible Lesson (Uniform Sunday School Series) for Sunday, August 14, 2011, is from Ruth 1:8-18.Five Questions for Discussion follow the Bible Lesson Commentary below. "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". There is scarcely any chapter in all the sacred history that stoops so low as this to take cognizance of so mean a person as Ruth, a poor Moabitish widow, so mean an action as her gleaning corn in a neighbour’s field, and the minute circumstances thereof. The selections seem designed to evoke the whole short book. "E.W. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". See the law, as detailed in Deuteronomy 25:5-10, and note at the beginning of chap. But Naomi said, "Return, my daughters. Today’s reading encompasses most of chapter 1, up to the point that Naomi and Ruth leave Moab. The events of Ruth occurred sometime between 1160 BC and 1100 BC, during the latter period of the judges (Ruth 1:1). 1-2 There was a time when judges ruled Israel. (10-13) Naomi pleads with her daughters-in-law to stay in Moab. KJV Ruth 1:1 ¶ Now it came to pass in the days when the judges ruled, that there was a famine in the land. "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". 2 The man’s name was Elimelek, his wife’s name was Naomi, and the names of his two sons were Mahlon and Kilion. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". Used by Permission. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". Copyright StatementThe New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Am I going to have any more sons, who could become your husbands? App-6. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ruth-1.html. The manifest love which united the hearts of those grieving ladies is brilliantly portrayed by the sobbing words of Naomi. Outline of Ruth 1 Elimelech and his sons die in the land of Moab. Have I yet sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands? this she said in order to get out of them if there was any real inclination in them to the true worship and service of God; though she keeps out that from her own questions put to them as follows, that it might come purely from themselves: are there yet any more sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands? The book of Ruth connects the book of Judges with the books of Samuel. ּלּתֶיהָ —is literally "her brides," that is, the brides of her sons. 12 Return home, my daughters; I am too old to have another husband. 25 volumes. 11. She intimates that she had no other sons to give them. An author is not mentioned in Ruth. Are there yet any more sons — This is said in allusion to the levirate law, which made it the duty of a person to marry his deceased brother’s widow and thus preserve his brother’s name and family. Commentary on the Old Testament. ELIMELECH FLEES THE FAMINE IN JUDAH TO SOJOURN IN MOAB (RUTH 1:1-5) "And it came to pass in the days when the judges ruled, that there was a famine in the land. During that time there was a famine in Judah. Chapter 2. "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. In the first place, the law relating to the Levirate marriage speaks only of brothers of the deceased, by which, according to the design of this institution, we must certainly think of sons by one father, but not necessarily the sons by the same mother. "Commentary on Ruth 1:11". To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient, John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible, are there yet any more sons in my womb, that they may be your husbands, Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible.
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